NBRPA Opens 2024-2025 Legends HBCU Scholarship Application

$10,000 Scholarships Available to Undergraduates Attending HBCUs

Chicago, ILL. April 1, 2024 - The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) today announced the opening of the 2024 application for the Legends HBCU Scholarship – a scholarship fund and scholars program for undergraduate students attending HBCUs across the country. Five applicants will be selected as Legends Scholars, receiving a $10,000 scholarship in recognition of their academic excellence and desire to make a positive and purposeful impact in the world.

In addition to addressing the financial needs of Legends Scholars, a comprehensive scholars program will assist Legends Scholars in the areas of career preparation and development, job placement and mentoring both during and after their undergraduate years.

“We are honored to be able to provide our platform to this legacy program and assist in developing future global leaders and in continuing the rich history of HBCU contributions to our society,” said Scott Rochelle, NBRPA President & CEO. “As a second generation HBCU graduate, this program, now in its fourth year, is much more than a scholarship.  It represents our efforts to provide support for HBCU institutions and ensure that these extraordinary students have access to the substantial and multifaceted resources offered through our Legends Scholars program throughout their collegiate careers and beyond.”

The Legends HBCU Scholarship and Legends Scholars programs were created in 2020 under the NBRPA’s Legends Care initiative to honor the rich history of HBCUs and their alums while moving the legacy forward by supporting current HBCU undergraduates. Since inception in 2020, Legends Scholars awardees have included:

2021:

  • Damon Germaine Bryan Jr | South Carolina State University, Class of 2022
  • Erin Foster | Spelman College, Class of 2024
  • Saniya Keeton | Tuskegee University, Class of 2023
  • Tyrell Miller-Johnson | Central State University, Class of 2023
  • Jayla Imani Thornton | North Carolina A&T State University, Class of 2024

2022:

  • Julian Bridges | Grambling State University, Class 2025
  • Marshaela Cooper | Tennessee State University, Class 2024
  • Adeja Shannon | Tennessee State University, Class 2024
  • Tyh’lana Tomlin | Howard University, Class 2025
  • Ti’Mia Wynn | Tuskegee University, Class 2024

2023:

  • Milan Harris | Albany State University, Class of 2026
  • Vanessa Johnson | Edward Waters College, Class of 2024
  • Maya Brunt | University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Class of 2024
  • Michael Clark | Howard University, Class of 2024
  • Azaria Howard | Tennessee State University, Class of 2025

The 2024 Legends HBCU Scholarship application opens on Monday, April 1, 2024, at legendsofbasketball.com/HBCU. Current undergraduates attending HBCUs will have the opportunity to apply until 11:59pm ET on Wednesday, May 15, 2024.

To support the Legends HBCU Scholarship and Legends Scholars program, please contact HBCU@legendsofbasketball.com.


About the National Basketball Retired Players Association:
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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CONTACTS:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com, (516) 749-9894

The 2024 Legends Summer Getaway will take place July 10-12 at the Fontainebleau Resort in Las Vegas.

More information will be made available in the coming weeks.

Registration for the 2024 Legends Summer Getaway will open to NBRPA members in late April.

Questions? Contact us at memberalert@legendsofbasketball.com

Acclaimed Health Screening Will Be Available to All WNBA Legends and WBCA Coaches

CHICAGO, Illinois, (March 18, 2024) - The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) today announced that it will conduct its acclaimed Health Screening Program during the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) Convention which will be held in conjunction with the NCAA Women’s Final Four in Cleveland, Ohio.  The program will be available to all registered WNBA Legends and coaches attending the WBCA Convention.   

The critically acclaimed program, under the supervision of the NBRPA Chief Medical Director Joe Rogowski, will focus on women’s health, delivered thorough, cost-effective, healthcare to its membership and addressing many of the medical issues experienced by the NBRPA population, while also educating them on proactive measures that promote a healthy lifestyle.

“Following the success of our inaugural women’s health screening program in Dallas last year, we are thrilled at the opportunity to bring the program to Cleveland and to be able to continue increasing our focus on health issues affecting women,” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA.  “We thank the WBCA for partnering with us to help bring this invaluable service to Cleveland and for helping extend these comprehensive examinations to the coaches that make up the WBCA membership along with our WNBA Legends.”

“I’m excited to be part of the continuation and enhancement of the health screening program to ensure women are receiving the proper care, especially for those members that may not have insurance or access,” said Rushia Brown, WNBA Legend and NBRPA Board Director.  “Programs like this are crucial to our members’ well-being and I fully encourage all members attending the NCAA Women’s Final Four to take advantage of this opportunity.” 

“So much emphasis is placed on the health of student-athletes, and rightfully so, but the health of coaches is equally important and vital to the continued success of our game,” said WBCA Executive Director Danielle Donehew. “Coaches are the constant. They lead selflessly. We want to make sure they also make their own health a priority. So, we are excited to partner with the NBRPA in offering health screenings to all coaches attending this year’s WBCA Convention in Cleveland.”

Launched in conjunction with the NBPA in 2016, to deliver valuable, preventive long-term healthcare check-ups to former professional players across the U.S., the Health Screening Program has impacted hundreds of former players by providing preventative testing, including blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, cardiology consultations and brain scans.

The NBRPA announced in 2022 that they would begin overseeing the program and brought along Joe Rogowski to head the operation. Rogowski, who served as the NBPA’s Chief Medical Officer for the past decade, was named the NBRPA’s Chief Medical Director in November 2022.

About the National Basketball Retired Players Association

The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

About the WBCA

The Women's Basketball Coaches Association is the professional association for coaches of women's and girls' basketball at all levels of competition. Founded in 1981, the WBCA offers educational resources that coaches need to help make themselves better leaders, teachers and mentors to their players; provides opportunities for coaches to connect with peers in the profession; serves as the unifying voice of a diverse community of coaches to the organizations that control the game; and celebrates those coaches, players and other individuals who excel each year and contribute to the advancement of the sport. Visit WBCA.org for more details about the association.

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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Media Contacts:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, (516) 749-9894, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com

NBRPA’s Nancy Lieberman, Janice Braxton, Cheryl Miller, & Cynthia Cooper to Join Current WNBA Stars Satou Sabally & Kelsey Plum as Coaches

Game Will Be Played at NCAA Women’s Final Four weekend on Saturday, April 6 and televised on ESPN2 at 3:30 p.m. ET.

CHICAGO, Illinois (March 14, 2024) – The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) and Intersport today announced that WNBA and Women's Basketball Legends Nancy Lieberman, Janice Braxton, Cheryl Miller, Cynthia Cooper will join current WNBA stars Satou Sabally and Kelsey Plum as coaches for the 2024 Women’s College All-Star Game on April 6th, at the Wolstein Center at Cleveland State University. The game, the first event of its kind since 2006, will be televised by ESPN2 at 3:30 pm ET. 

Twenty-five years after launching a national women’s college basketball all-star event, Intersport has re-introduced the Women’s College All-Star Game as an annual showcase spotlighting the country’s elite players. These standouts, who will be exhausting their collegiate eligibility and are on the precipice of hearing their names called in the WNBA Draft, will have one final opportunity to represent their programs and be recognized against the backdrop of the sport’s championship weekend. Intersport launched the inaugural Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) All-Star Challenge in 1998, which the WBCA operated through 2006. 

“The NBRPA is thrilled to once again partner with Intersport and to be able to have our WNBA Legends as part of this incredible event,” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA. “Having icons like Cheryl, Janice, Cynthia and a member of our very own board of directors in Nancy, join up with two of today’s brightest stars in Satou and Kelsey to coach these phenomenal players, gives us an immense sense of pride to be able to help showcase the past, present and future of the game of basketball.”

“I’m honored to join these incredible and legendary women to coach these phenomenal talents,” said Nancy Lieberman, Two-time Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame inductee (Class of 1996/2023), WNBA Legend and NBRPA Board Director, Treasurer.  “I very much look forward to what promises to be an amazing atmosphere and game and seeing the greatness on the court.”

Tickets for the 2024 Women’s College All Star Game can be purchased at https://womenscollegeallstar.com/

 About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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Contacts:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com

NBRPA’s Acclaimed Health Screening Program Has Also Made Stops in Orlando, Los Angeles, NBA All-Star in Indianapolis, and Coming to the NCAA Women’s Final Four in Cleveland and the NBRPA’s Annual Legends Summer Getaway in Las Vegas

Detroit, Michigan, (Feb. 27, 2024) - The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA), this past weekend brought its acclaimed Health Screening program for former players based in Detroit, Michigan.  NBA/WNBA/ABA and Harlem Globetrotter Legends in the Detroit and surrounding area took part in the NBRPA’s Health Screening program at the Pistons Performance Center on Saturday, February 24 and underwent wide-ranging screening procedures, that included blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, and cardiology consultations and more.

The critically acclaimed program, under the supervision of the NBRPA Chief Medical Director Joe Rogowski, focuses on player health, delivered thorough, cost-effective, healthcare to its membership and address many of the medical issues experienced by the NBRPA population, while also educating them on proactive measures that promote a healthy lifestyle.

“We are proud to showcase our Health Screening Program for our members living in and around Detroit and are extremely thankful for the hospitality offered by the Detroit Pistons in providing space at their Pistons Performance Center” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA.  “This crucial program, that last weekend was a major activation at NBA All-Star in Indianapolis - presents an incredible occasion for us to deliver this free service to where our members live and work and we look forward to continuing to bring this invaluable benefit to other markets across the United States, including our annual Legends Summer Getaway in Las Vegas later this year.” Added Rochelle, “In conjunction with the NBRPA Detroit Chapter’s “Dinner For Black Excellence” event this past weekend, and numerous Legends participating, this was a fantastic opportunity for us to gather and bring this robust health program to the Motor City.”

Launched in conjunction with the NBPA in 2016, to deliver valuable, preventive long-term healthcare check-ups to former professional players across the U.S., the Health Screening Program has impacted hundreds of former players by providing preventative testing, including blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms and cardiology consultations.

The NBRPA announced in 2022 that they would begin overseeing the program and brought along Joe Rogowski to head the operation. Rogowski, who served as the NBPA’s Chief Medical Officer for the past decade, was named the NBRPA’s Chief Medical Director in November 2022.

About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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Media Contacts:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, (516) 749-9894, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com

Legends Content Reaches Over 875 Million Across Combined Social Media Channels

Chicago, Illinois. Feb 22, 2024 – The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) announced today that its Legends Media & Entertainment (LME) NBA All-Star 2024 – Indianapolis content reached a record, combined estimated 875 million fans, surpassing last year’s 850 million fans reached mark.  Combined content generated on the NBRPA’s @NBAAlumni social media channels, partner activations, media coverage and fan interaction, yielded over 11 million unique views and a 200% increase in fans, and combined video views, impressions, and engagement during NBA All-Star Weekend. 

NBRPA content delivered exclusive coverage from a variety of events in Indianapolis including:

  • Full Court Press Clinic at Crispus Attucks High School
  • Legends Care Food Drive
  • Legends All-Star Lounge
  • Legends All-Star Media Day pres. by Gateway for Cancer Research
  • Medical Summit pres. by Endeavor Health
  • Beyond Sports Summit pres. by Google
  • Legends Brunch
  • NBA Rising Stars, All-Star Saturday Night and the 73rd NBA All-Star Game

“The opportunity to bring in over 200 NBA, WNBA, ABA and Harlem Globetrotter Legends and a full complement of world class partners to Indianapolis, presents a unique occasion to showcase the history of the game of basketball,” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA. “NBA All-Star is the epicenter of the basketball universe and it’s an honor for the NBRPA to be part of the fabric that showcases these legendary men and women that have built the sport into what it is today.”

“The exclusive content that we can deliver resonates loudly with basketball fans and our followers,” said Julio Manteiga, Head of Communications/Content, NBRPA.  “From behind-the-scenes coverage to exclusive series featuring some of the most famous names in basketball lore to in-depth conversations with Legends that shaped the history of professional basketball, there is no shortage of interest from fans to stay connected to their heroes and we look forward to creating more compelling content around marquee events on the basketball calendar.”

About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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CONTACT:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA – jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com, (516) 749-9894

By Alex Kennedy

Throughout Larry Bird’s NBA journey, he succeeded in every role he attempted. As a player, he had one of the greatest careers of all-time; the 12-time All-Star won three championships, three MVP awards and two Finals MVP awards. Then, after retiring, the Hall-of-Famer thrived as a head coach and general manager with the Indiana Pacers. Bird became just the second person in NBA history to be honored as Coach of the Year and Executive of the Year (joining Pat Riley).

Bird coached the Pacers from 1997 to 2000, going 147-67 in the regular season and 32-20 in the playoffs. Indiana advanced to at least the Eastern Conference Finals in each of Bird’s three years on the sideline, and they made the NBA Finals in 2000.

Pacers center Rik Smits played under Bird for all three seasons, becoming a first-time All-Star in Bird’s first year as head coach. In a recent interview with Legends Magazine, Smits spoke candidly about Bird’s coaching style and what it was like playing for him.

“He was not what I expected,” Smits said with a laugh. “Not at all. I mean, he was a great guy. But the first thing he did was hire [assistant coaches] Dick Harter and Rick Carlisle. Dick Harter was the defensive coach, Rick Carlisle was the offensive coach, and they basically did all the coaching. Larry just clapped his hands and said, ‘Let's go guys!’ (Laughs) Larry made the substitutions, but we knew the exact second we would come out of the game because every game was the same. [When] he came in, he ran the heck out of us. He said, ‘Hey, you guys know what you're doing, you're in the NBA for a reason. I'm gonna make sure you're in the best shape possible.’ And he did! I mean, our shootarounds on the day of the game were probably harder than some of the practices we had with past coaches. He ran the heck out of us. We were in great shape. But as far as coaching, the assistants did most of the coaching during the game. He was more of a motivator. 

“He might've given a pointer here or there, but I was expecting him to be more of a teacher, you know? And he wasn't. He did spend more time with Jeff Foster and Jonathan Bender because those were the rookies coming in. He would work with them after practice and stuff, but not with any of the [veterans] who were there. When he came in, he explained this. He said, 'I'm gonna run the shit outta you and make sure you're in the best shape possible.' It was just a different coach than what we'd had before. It was what we needed because Larry Brown was the complete opposite. Larry Brown thinks he's the teacher and, you know, everything you did, Larry Brown thought it was wrong and he’d want to teach us something else. And that's why he didn't last. He probably lasted the longest with us of any team. But yeah, the two Larry’s were the complete opposites of each other. But we had success with both.”

Carlisle and Harter both went on to become head coaches in the NBA. Carlisle is currently the Pacers’ head coach, and he also had head-coaching stints with the Detroit Pistons and Dallas Mavericks. He won a championship with the Mavs in 2011 and won the NBA's Coach-of-the-Year award in 2002. Carlisle has 917 career wins (and counting) as a head coach, which is 14th-most in NBA history. Harter was the Charlotte Hornets' head coach from 1988 to 1990 – the first head coach in franchise history.

One of the biggest ways that Bird impacted Smits was by introducing the center to his longtime physical therapist, Dan Dyrek. Smits had been dealing with nerve damage in both feet, which required surgery. After working with Dyrek, the difference was night and day. While the internet would have you believe that Smits retired due to his feet, he insists that’s not true.

“No, that never [factored in]. The feet were fine,” Smits said. “When Larry Bird came in my last three years, he had a great physical therapist out of Boston, Dan Dyrek, and he took care of those feet. Those were never a problem again. Early on in my career, I had that, and then the rumor got started that [my feet] are why I retired, but that wasn't true at all. I felt it was right. Bird was retiring and Isiah [Thomas] was coming in. There was gonna be some changes. It was just the right time. I wanted to retire at the top. I considered coming back and gave it some thought, but I was ready to be home with my son and my family and start enjoying life, so that’s what I did.”

Smits’ feet felt so good that he actually continued playing basketball several times a week after he walking away from the NBA.

“[After I retired], I still played a lot of [rec] league basketball,” Smits said. “We’d go to different gyms and stuff, and I owned a gym for a while, so I was playing ball probably two or three times a week. Then, on the weekends, we’d do tournaments. I did that into my 40s. … It doesn’t add up at all. My feet are fine; I don’t have any issues with that.”

Smits is a beloved Pacer, who will be returning to Indiana for NBA All-Star Weekend – his first time attending the event since he played in the 1998 All-Star Game.

“I'm excited! I always said if it comes to Indiana, I'm gonna go,” Smits said. “And the Pacers actually invited me. They invited some of the old players to come and I think they're gonna have a little get-together on Thursday or something. I'm excited to see who shows up.”

SPENCER HAYWOOD, RUSHIA BROWN, EDDIE GILL AND BOB ELLIOTT ELECTED TO SERVE AS DIRECTORS

Indianapolis, IND. Feb 16, 2024 – The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) announced today the election of its newest board members, including the naming of Directors Spencer Haywood, Rushia Brown, Eddie Gill and Bob Elliott.  Additionally, Nancy Lieberman, and C.J. Kupek were named to the following Officer positions – Treasurer and Secretary, respectively. 

“We are thrilled to welcome Spencer Haywood, Rushia Brown, Eddie Gill and Bob Elliott as the newest additions to the NBRPA’s Board of Directors,” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA.  “These latest additions, along with the return of Spencer and Bob to our board are a testament to our commitment to best represent all viewpoints from across our organization and provide the utmost professionalism and leadership for our membership.”  Added Rochelle “I would also like to welcome Nancy Lieberman and C.J. Kupec in joining Charles “Choo” Smith (Chairman of the Board) and Shawn Marion (Vice Chairman) as NBRPA Officers and extend the NBRPA’s full gratitude to outgoing board members Grant Hill, Jerome Williams, Johnny Davis and Sam Perkins for their selfless dedication during their tenures on our board.”

NBRPA Directors are responsible for executing the NBRPA mission to serve former professional basketball players, supporting them in life after their playing days, and assisting them in leveraging their inspirational influence and to promote and teach basketball in their communities.

Spencer Haywood - is an Olympic gold medalist and a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, being inducted in 2015.  Haywood attended Trinidad State Junior College in Trinidad, Colorado, during the 1967–68 college season, where he averaged 28.2 points and 22.1 rebounds per game. Due to his exceptional performance and talent, Haywood made the 1968 U.S. Olympic team at age 19, becoming the youngest American basketball player in Olympic history. Haywood was the leading scorer on the gold medal winning team at 16.1 points per game, and he set a Team USA field goal percentage record of .719.  Haywood transferred to the University of Detroit in the fall of that year and led the NCAA in rebounding with a 21.5 average per game while scoring 32.1 points per game during the 1968–69 season.

Haywood decided to turn pro after his sophomore year, but National Basketball Association (NBA) rules, which then required a player to wait until four years after his high school class graduated, prohibited him from entering the league. The American Basketball Association (ABA) had a similar rule, but league executive Mike Storen came up with the idea for a hardship exemption. With his mother raising 10 children while picking cotton at $2 per day in Mississippi, Haywood met the criteria.  He joined the Denver Rockets after they selected him in the ABA draft.

In his 1969–70 rookie season, Haywood led the ABA in both scoring at 30.0 points per game and rebounding at 19.5 rebounds per game, while leading the Rockets to the ABA's Western Division Title. In the playoffs, Denver defeated the Washington Caps in 7 games in the Western Division Semifinals before falling to the Los Angeles Stars in the division finals, 4 games to 1. He was named both the ABA Rookie of the Year and ABA MVP during the season and became the youngest ever recipient of the MVP at the age of 21. His 986 field goals made, 1,637 rebounds, and 19.5 rebound per game average are the all-time ABA records for a season. Haywood also won the ABA's 1970 All-Star Game MVP that year after recording 23 points, 19 rebounds, and 7 blocked shots for the West team.

In 1970, despite the NBA's eligibility rules, Haywood joined the Seattle SuperSonics, and with SuperSonics owner Sam Schulman launched an antitrust suit against the league (Haywood v. National Basketball Association). The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court before the NBA agreed to a settlement. The suit and its impact on college basketball and the NBA was the focus of a 2020 book The Spencer Haywood Rule: Battles, Basketball, and the Making of an American Iconoclast by Marc J. Spears and Gary Washburn.

Haywood was named to the All-NBA First Team in 1972 and 1973 and the All-NBA Second Team in 1974 and 1975. Haywood's 29.2 points per game in the 1972–73 season and 13.4 rebounds per game in 1973–74 are the single-season record averages for the SuperSonics for these categories. Haywood played in four NBA All-Star Games while with Seattle, including a strong 23-point, 11-rebound performance in 1974. In the 1974–75 season, he helped lead the SuperSonics to their first playoff berth. Overall, during his five seasons with Seattle, Haywood averaged 24.9 points per game and 12.1 rebounds per game.

In 1975, the SuperSonics traded him to the New York Knicks where he later teamed with Bob McAdoo. Haywood later played for the New Orleans Jazz, Los Angeles Lakers, and Washington Bullets.

Rushia Brown - Rushia Brown was born in the Bronx, NY and raised in South Carolina and was one of the top student-athlete recruits in the state of South Carolina as a senior; being courted by esteemed universities such as Harvard, Duke University and her then dream school, the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. With the loss of her father, Rushia chose to stay close to home and attend Furman University.

As a Lady Paladin, Rushia pursued her education and competed on the court, attaining every accolade available including Southern Conference Freshman of the Year, multiple MVPs, Southern Conference Player of the Year, Edna Hartness Athlete of the Year and eventually having her jersey hang from the rafters as #34 was retired. Rushia’s collegiate years lead to a 10-year professional career overseas, which spanned 5 countries; Spain, France, Italy, Greece and Korea and 7 years in the WNBA; 6 years in Cleveland and 1 year in Charlotte. 

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Brown has made her mark in various sectors of business and continues to travel the world inspiring others to use their gifts and talents to pursue their dreams. Rushia spent 5 years as a WNBA executive. Her 1st experience was working in the NBA/WNBA front office in New York as a member of the Crossover Program. In 2018 Brown helped relocate the San Antonio Silver Stars to Las Vegas, where she served as the Player Programs & Franchise Development Manager for the Las Vegas Aces for 2 years. Brown then served as the Director of Community Relations and Youth Sports for the Los Angeles Sparks for 2 years. She also serves as a catalyst for change for those looking to take their lives and professions to the next level.

Eddie Gill - played college basketball at the College of Eastern Utah, Salt Lake Community College, and Weber State University. With the Weber State Wildcats, Gill was MVP of the 1999 Big Sky Conference tournament.

Not selected in the 2000 NBA draft, Gill began his professional career with the Las Vegas Silver Bandits of the IBL and debuted with the New Jersey Nets of the NBA late in the 2000–01 season. Gill has had a journeyman career in basketball and has played in various teams in the NBA, NBA Development League, minor leagues, and overseas. In the NBA, Gill has played for the New Jersey Nets, Memphis Grizzlies, Portland Trail Blazers, Indiana Pacers, Seattle SuperSonics, and Milwaukee Bucks all usually in reserve roles. However, Gill has been a starter and high scorer for much of his non-NBA career. Professionally, Gill has been an All-Star selection in the CBA (2004) and NBA Development League (2008) and won championships with the D-League (2009 with the Colorado 14ers) and Belgian Cup (2010 with BC Oostende).

Gill also won a regional Emmy award for his work as an analyst on Pacers Live Pregame.

Bob Elliot – was a three-time academic and athletic All-American at the University of Arizona, leading his team to a Western Athletic Conference championship and two NCAA tournament appearances. He was a 1977 Third Team All American, a 1975, 1976 and 1977. Third Team All-WAC conference honoree, and a 1975, 1976, and 1977 Academic All American. Elliott received a Bachelor of Science in accounting, and later, an MBA from the University of Arizona as well.

He is also a past chairman of the NBRPA.   Elliott was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA, but never played for them. He spent half a year playing basketball in Europe and three seasons with the New Jersey Nets. Following his NBA career, Elliott briefly played for the Detroit Spirits of the Continental Basketball Association during the 1982–83 season.

Elliott currently resides in Tucson, Arizona. He and his wife Beverely have four adult children and ten grandchildren. Elliott also owns a successful accounting practice, Elliott Accounting Group, in Tucson that has been active for over 30 years.

C.J. Kupec – a former power forward/center in the National Basketball Association for the Los Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets, Kupec was selected by the Los Angeles Lakers in the 4th round of the 1975 NBA Draft and was also selected by the Spirits of St. Louis in the fifth round of the 1975 ABA Draft. 

After playing in the NBA, Kupec was a member of Olimpia Billy Milano, BredaBAU Bellinzona, Squibb Cantù (won Euroleague/Cup of Champions 1982), SAV Bergamo, Viola Reggio Calabria, Mister Day Siena and Spondilatte Cremona teams in Europe.  He played college basketball and football at the University of Michigan, where he won Big 10 championships in both sports.  Kupec attended Oak Lawn Community High School, where he played center at six-foot-eight, played football and earned High School All-America honors. 

Nancy Lieberman - nicknamed "Lady Magic", Lieberman is an American former professional basketball player and coach in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) who is currently a broadcaster for the Oklahoma City Thunder of the National Basketball Association (NBA) as well as the head coach of Power, a team in the BIG3 which she led to its 2018 Championship. Lieberman is regarded as one of the greatest figures in American women's basketball.

In 2000, she was inducted into the Nassau County Sports Hall of Fame. Lieberman is a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame the St. Louis Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, and the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

In July 2015, she was hired by the Sacramento Kings as an assistant coach, becoming the second female assistant coach in NBA history. She took two leaves of absence to care for her ailing mother before leaving the Kings in 2017. After the Kings, she became a broadcaster with the New Orleans Pelicans.

About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Nancy Lieberman, Secretary C.J. Kupec, Spencer Haywood, Eddie Gill, Rushia Brown, Bob Elliott, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com

To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch

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CONTACT:

Julio Manteiga, NBRPA – jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com, (516) 749-9894

NBRPA membership is comprised of a diverse group of former professional basketball players of the NBA, ABA, WNBA, and Harlem Globetrotters.

Each month, we'll spotlight NBRPA members from each league to recognize their career on the court as well as the impact they are now having in their communities.

Jerry Stackhouse

NBA

From an electrifying college playing career after playing for legendary head coach Dean Smith and earning Sports Illustrated Player of the Year, All-America first team and All- ACC honors at North Carolina, Jerry Stackhouse was selected by the Philadelphia 76ers with the third overall pick in the 1995 NBA Draft. He was named to the 1995-96 NBA All-Rookie first team after leading all first-year players in scoring (19.8 points).

Stackhouse played 18 seasons in the NBA for 8 teams. He was selected to play in 2 All-Star games.

Stackhouse received his bachelor’s degree from North Carolina in the fall of 1999, and completed the Business of Entertainment, Media and Sports at the Harvard Business School executive education program in 2017.

He was the head coach of Raptors 905 and an assistant coach for the Toronto Raptors and Memphis Grizzlies. Additionally, he has worked as an NBA TV analyst. On April 5, 2019, Stackhouse was named as the Vanderbilt men’s basketball program, making him the program’s 28th head coach. The 2023-24 season is the fifth for Jerry Stackhouse leading the resurgence of the Vanderbilt men’s basketball program.

Stackhouse has guided the Commodores to back-to-back winning seasons and NIT quarterfinals berths in 2022 and 2023, sent four student-athletes to the NBA and coached two SEC Scholar Athletes of the Year in his first four seasons in Nashville.

For the 2022-23 season, he earned SEC Co-Coach of the Year, Tennessee Sports Writers Association Coach of the Year and Ben Jobe National Minority Coach of the Year honors. The team’s 22 wins in 2022-23 were the most since a 25-win season in 2011-12. Vandy also finished tied for fourth in the SEC regular season standings, the best finish for the Dores since 2011-12.

Greg Oden

NBA

Greg Oden was born in Buffalo, NY and moved with his family to Terre Haute, IN at the age of nine. He attended Sarah Scott Middle School in Terre Haute, where he first played interscholastic basketball. Oden then relocated with his mother and brother and attended Lawrence North High school in Indianapolis, which he led to three consecutive Indiana Class 4A basketball championships before graduating in 2006.

He was named Parade’s High School Co-Player of the Year 2005 and 2005 National Boys Basketball Player of the Year. He repeated as Gatorade National Boys Basketball Player of the Year in 2006. Oden was named the 2006 Indiana Mr. Basketball. He was also on the McDonald’s All-American Team and played in the All-American game, and earned first- team Parade All-American honors for the second straight year.

Oden, a 7'0" center, played college basketball at Ohio State University for one season, during which the team was the Big Ten Conference regular season champion and Big Ten Conference men’s basketball tournament champion with Oden as the tournament MOP.

On June 28, 2007, Greg Oden was selected first overall in the 2007 NBA Draft by the Portland Trail Blazers. He signed with the Miami Heat in August 2013 and played with the team through the 2014 NBA Playoffs.

On April 12, 2016, Oden was hired by the Ohio State Buckeyes men’s basketball team to be the student manager for the team while he went back to finish his degree at the college. In 2019, Oden graduated from Ohio State with a bachelor's degree in sport industry.

On November 21, 2019, Edyoucore Sports & Entertainment announced that Oden had joined their team as an athlete advisor.

In April 2022, Oden joined Thad Matta’s staff at Butler University as director of basketball operations.

Oden married his wife Sabrina in 2017. They have one child, a daughter named Londyn, born in 2016.

Warren Davis

ABA

Warren Lee Davis was born in Halifax, Virginia. After graduating from Mary M Bethune High School, he got a job but kept playing ball on the side. He was later recruited by Cal Irvin to play at North Carolina A&T on a perennial 20-win team.

In his first season on the Aggies varsity, Warren pulled down 381 rebounds to set a new school record. It still ranks third on the school’s all-time single season list. A&T captured the CIAA championship that season. The Aggies won the championship again in 1967.

In 1967, Warren began his pro career with the Anaheim Amigos of the newly formed American Basketball Association. In 1968–69, Warren played for the Los Angeles Stars under NBA legend Bill Sharman. He led the team in rebounding and played both forward and center for the Stars. Warren was selected to represent the West in the ABA All-Star Game.

The following season, the Stars acquired power forward Willie Wise, making Warren expandable. He was traded to the Pittsburgh Pipers at midseason. He averaged 12 points and 12 rebounds a game playing for another pro hoops legend, Buddy Jeannette.

Warren then joined the Miami Floridians, his fourth team in as many seasons in 1970–71. At the conclusion of the season, he wrote a letter to the Carolina Cougars asking for a tryout –– Coach Tom Meschery gave him a shot and Warren made the club. Halfway through the season, he was traded to the Memphis Pros for Wendell Ladner.

Warren played his final year in the ABA with Memphis in 1972–73 and was out of basketball at the age of 30, but his name can still be found in the ABA record books. He is ranked among the Top 20 in career offensive rebounds, defensive rebounds and rebounds per game. His name can also be found in the North Carolina A&T record books—and the A&T Hall of Fame. Warren was inducted in 2003, at the age of 60.

Stephen Chubin

ABA

Stephen Chubin was born in New York City and played college basketball at the University of Rhode Island, where he became the school's all- time leading scorer.

He was inducted into the University of Rhode Island Athletics Hall of Fame in 1981.

He won a gold medal with Team USA in basketball at the 1965 Maccabiah Games in Israel.

While in his dorm room, Chubin got the call that he was drafted to the NBA’s San Francisco Warriors. At the same time, Chubin was offered Bill Bradley’s spot on Italy’s basketball team, the second-best squad in the world behind America. He immediately accepted, not confident that he would make the NBA that year.

The opening of the ABA drastically increased the amount of playing positions. Chubin returned to the United States and played his first two years in the ABA in Los Angeles, later playing in Indiana followed by two years on the New York Nets.

After retiring from the ABA, Chubin played basketball in Israel before moving to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. It was there where he learned about his friend Warren Jabali’s Midnight Basketball program in Miami, which taught the game to inner-city youths. With the help of a government grant, Chubin opened a similar program in Fort Lauderdale in the ’90s called Broward County Under the Stars.

Chubin now lives in Denver, and though he is no longer involved in an organized program, he enjoys helping neighborhood children develop fundamental basketball skills, finding that he still has what it takes to offer helpful tips to young players.

Andrea Garner

WNBA

Andrea Garner was raised in the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia, where she fell in love with the game and developed into a nationally known player for J.R. Masterman High School.

Throughout high school, Andrea earned numerous awards for her athletic and academic excellence, becoming the first and only student- athlete from Masterman High School to earn a full four-year athletic scholarship to a Division I University. Andrea accepted an athletic scholarship to play basketball at The Pennsylvania State University, where she was a four-year starter for the women’s team. She would go on to earn many accolades during her collegiate career at Penn State before graduating with a B.S. degree in Business Marketing.

Upon graduation, Andrea was drafted to the Houston Comets and also played for the Seattle Storm in the WNBA. She played professionally in the US and abroad before ending her basketball career in 2005.

Andrea has been able to do what most people dream in combining her passion for sports into a successful and fulfilling career in education. Throughout Andrea's personal life and professional career, she has strived to be a tangible example of what true leadership looks like in her community and in her home. She has mentored hundreds of students and is the mother of two amazing children.

Andrea is a mother, a mentor, a leader, the Executive Director for Inspiring Minds Greater Philadelphia, an employee for Nike at Nike headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon, and a proud serving member of the National Basketball Retired Players Association.

Chantelle Anderson

WNBA

Chantelle Anderson is a former professional athlete and award-winning sales representative turned speaker, author, and minister. Chantelle attended Vanderbilt University on a basketball scholarship and majored in Human and Organizational Development. Four years later, she graduated as the school’s all-time scoring leader and its first 2-time Kodak All-American.

Chantelle Anderson was selected as the 2nd overall pick in the WNBA draft and played for six years in Sacramento, San Antonio and Atlanta, as well as professionally in Europe. She has been inducted into both the Vanderbilt Athletics and the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame.

After 4 years in Corporate America, she started Anderson Consulting, a coaching and consulting firm focusing on proven performance strategies. Chantelle has taught her curriculum at companies such as Google, UnitedHealth Group, and Charles Schwab, and been featured on platforms and media outlets such as TEDx, CBS, and ESPNW.

In 2018, Chantelle chose to pursue ministry in addition to corporate speaking. She got her bachelors degree in ministry for women and was ordained as a pastor for women. She started her online brand, Confidently His, which is a platform to help women build their confidence, identity, and creativity with God. In 2020 she published her first book of devotionals entitled, "God, What The Heck?! 100 Devotionals for When Life Sucks," and has spoken at ministries from California to London on spiritual confidence.

Chantelle now lives in Los Angeles, California where she also serves as a proud member of the National Basketball Retired Players Association. In her free time, you can find Chantelle at an open mic night, eating Mexican food, or hosting a movie night with friends.

Greg Bell

Harlem Globetrotters

Greg Bell was born in Cleveland, Ohio. Through learning the fundamentals of the game and playing at various Cleveland Recreation Centers he became one of the top Jr. High School players in the Greater Cleveland Area.

In 1983 he became 1st Team All-Ohio, All State, AAA Northeast Ohio player of The Year, 1st Player from Shaw High School to play in the North/South Classic All-Star Game, and Nate Thurmond Recipient Award Winner.

Greg Bell attended Southeast Community College in Burlington, Iowa from 1983-1985 where he was 1st Team All-Region and SCC Top 50 players.

Greg Bell transferred to Southwest Missouri State University from 1985-1987 where he continued to have a stellar career: 1986 AMCU All-Newcomer Team, SMS Coors Player of the Week five times in 1986, SMS Coor Player of the Week five times in 1987, SW Missouri State’s First ever NCAA Appearance 1987, and 2005 SW Missouri State Hall of Fame Recipient.

Bell joined the World-Famous Harlem Globetrotters and played from 1990-1992 with both National and International units as The Court Jester, and Showman.

Greg founded BELL SPORTS FOUNDATION in 2011. BSF mission is to “Inspire Youth through Sports” and build and enrich communities and lives of individuals by providing a safe, welcoming and rewarding environment for all participants, at all levels of wellness and recreation.

The Board of Governors of the American Basketball Hall of Fame Foundation announced this month that Cleveland’s own Greg Bell has been selected to the American Basketball Hall of Fame, Class of 2024.

Greg currently is the founder and owner of Fundamental Basketball Skills with G. Bell LLC. Greg Bell is married and has two daughters, and 3 grandchildren.

Lionel Garrett

Harlem Globetrotters

Lionel Garrett is like a "rolling stone," wherever he lays his hat is his home. He first laid his "basketball" hat at HBCU Southern University where he dominated the SWAC Conference from 75-79. He was named to the All-SWAC team 3 years leading the SWAC in Rebounding his senior season (15.8). He still holds several NCAA D1 records, including a single-game 30 point, 30 rebound effort, during the '79 season, when he finished tops in rebounding nationally. Garrett was a natural forward. He was the Leading rebounder for the Southern University Championship Team earning All SWAC and All American honors. In 2007 inducted into the Southern University Athletic Hall of Fame.

After signing with the San Diego Clippers when picked in the '79 NBA Draft, Garrett hung his brim with the with the Hall of Fame team the Harlem Globetrotters as their designated rebounder. Garrett then had a stint with CAI Zaragoza in Spain and then the Ohio Mixers and Wyoming Wildcatters of the CBA.

With over 30 years of basketball coaching and scouting experience in the NBA, NAIA, NCAA, CBA, WBA, ABA, and FIBA having coached in 3 countries Saudi Arabia, Mexico and Cyprus also 3 HBCU Colleges Miles, Talladega and Wilberforce. Also coaching Professionally for 12 years leading Pro Camps and player development helping many players achieve playing Professionally dreams.

Garrett is founder of Rebound DR Player Development, Don’t Foul Out Youth Awareness/ Playground League and Stay on The Ball Stay off Drugs youth programs.

Lionel is a natural born Goodwill Ambassador and proud Globetrotter for Life.

By Chris Sheridan

Back in the day when Derrick Coleman was in high school, word of mouth on the streets of Detroit would spread the news that George Gervin was coming to town to play at the tiny little gym on Livernois Avenue and Stearns Street known as ”The Saint” – aka St. Cecilia.

Sam Washington, the gym’s caretaker back in those days, doubled the price of admission from $1 to $2 when the “Iceman” was coming to town.

Washington was the gatekeeper at the 300-seat gym where high school, college and pro basketball players gathered every summer for pickup games in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s, and players from the state of Michigan feel it should have the same exposure as the Drew League in Los Angeles or the Rucker League in New York.

“The whole reason I wore No. 44 throughout my career was because of what George Gervin meant to me. The first time I met him I was a junior in high school and there were whispers going around that he was up in the stands, and I went up and introduced myself, and he took the time to mentor me.”

Coleman is holding an event in Dearborn, Michigan the week after the All-Star game to honor Gervin and Washington, but that is not the main purpose of the event. The Detroit chapter of the Retired Players Association is trying to raise $20 million for a full makeover of the Saint Cecilia gym, which has been more or less shuttered for the past 4-5 years.

“I used to take the bus down there for a quarter at 8 in the morning, eat lunch at Burger King, play ball all day and not leave until 9 o’clock at night,” said Earl Cureton, who played in the NBA, in Italy, in Puerto Rico, Argentina, Venezuela and Mexico before returning to Michigan, where he is now a team ambassador for the Pistons and also calls University of Detroit games as a broadcaster. “Kids these days do not have a safe place like that where they can be surrounded by role models, and we want to bring that back. It kept you around the right mentors and the right people.

Cureton, former Mayor Dave Bing and Coleman are heading a group that is trying to raise $20 million for a full reconstruction of the iconic gym where generations of the best players from Michigan gathered every summer. Cureton remembers Spencer Haywood being especially excited to be driving up in a brand new Cadillac after he made it to the NBA and he got his first big contract.

Chris Webber, Jalen Rose, Rudy Tomjanovich, Voshon Lenard, Walker D, Russell, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, Campy Russell, Dave DeBusschere, Tom LaGarde, Roy Tarpley, Mo Taylor, Voshon Lenard, John Long – they all played at St. Cecilia – Known in The D as “The Saint,” during the summers. Like many old Catholic school gyms, it was small with a stage at one end covered with padding and had a largely unused stage at the other end. The ceiling was low, and longer shots would scrape the paint above the court.

This is how they envision the rebuild looking:

Cureton remembers showing up with Darryl Dawkins, and when they got to the door where Mr. Washington was controlling the show, Dawkins was told that he would not be allowed to play because there were not any spare backboards.

Coleman and the Detroit chapter of the NBRPA are holding that dinner to honor Gervin, but the bigger goal is to raise roughly $20 million for a full renovation of the building, removing the low ceiling, allowing skylight to flow through new windows, installing bleachers, and building community fresh markets on one side of the building under the stands, and meeting spaces under the other side of the bleachers. The architectural firm Jeffrey A Scott L.C. from Farmington, Mich. has already put together a comprehensive 39-page rehabilitation plan, the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit is on board, and the goal is to get the project completed sooner rather than later so that young Detroit and Michigan ballers can have the same iconic hoops destination as their predecessors had.

Often nicknamed “The Mecca,” Saint Cecilia is the most famous gym in Detroit but has been mostly shuttered for the last 4-5 years. Coleman, Cureton and Bing, the former Mayor of Detroit and one of the NBRPA’s founders, are trying to change that.

“The most memorable thing I remember was watching Chris Webber as a high school junior grabbing a defensive rebound, taking it the length of the court and dunking on some unfortunate defender. I knew right then he would be a pro,” Bing said.

Coleman remembers Steve Smith, now on NBA-TV, perfecting his “Smitty” hesitation move. “You would go into that sweatbox – it was like 110 degrees in there in the summertime – and you would look at the layup line and see 10 to 15 NBA players on any given Saturday,” Coleman said. “Dave Bing brought guys from the Pistons in to play with high school kids.

“For me, could you imagine what it as like walking into a gym and seeing your idol, which is what happened with me and George Gervin? I am still I awe, and people need to recognize how many NBA players the state of Michigan has produced. A terrible job has been done telling that story,” Coleman said.

“When I won a championship with the Philadelphia 76ers, folks from Detroit still wanted to know if I was going to win the title at The Saint later that summer,” Cureton recalled. “Guys came from Flint, from Saginaw, from Pontiac, and Bernard King and a team of the best young New York players once made the trip. It was a place where young kids could talk to real NBA players in the parking lot.”

Earl Cureton, Dave Bing, Greg Kelser, Derrick Coleman and Grant Long Discuss St. Cecilia’s Gym.

The story of Saint Cecilia would make a great documentary if there as any footage of those games, but this was in the pre cell-phone age, and 8-millimeter and/or VCR or Betamax tapes of those games have never been located. What endures are the stories.

Coleman’s event on Feb. 23, 2024 at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. will specifically honor Gervin and Washington, and interested parties (whether to attend or to donate) can contact sunni@nbrpdetroit.org.

If all goes well, a good time will be had by all.  

If all goes much better than expected, a sizeable chunk of the $20 million will be raised with a lump sum donation from someone with a fat wallet, and the rebuild of Saint Cecilia goes from the drawing board to the construction phase on an expedited basis. If that happens, the most famous gym in Detroit is back up and running again in 2025 instead of 2027 or 2028.

Think about how many young lives that will impact in a positive way. Coleman, Cureton, Bing, Gervin, Washington and others want it, but they cannot do it alone. And anyone who has been keeping up with the ongoing efforts to revitalize Detroit understands that one of America’s historically great cities could use this boost sooner rather than later. Let’s see if someone special makes that happen.

NBA’s In Season Tournament, NBRPA’s Legends of Basketball Invitational, the WNBA’s Success and a Potential Las Vegas Based NBA Franchise Make This Desert Oasis Fertile Ground For NBRPA Members

By Chris Sheridan

LAS VEGAS – A’ja Wilson of the WNBA champion Las Vegas Aces did not know she had a tough act to follow, but she came in at the red-carpet entrance of the NBA Cup on Saturday night right after Flavor Flav had finished talking about how he once played against Moses Malone. And how he would like to play one-on-one against Atlanta Hawks superstar Trae Young.

Any NBA player who has reached the finals would recognize many of the trappings: All hands on deck for ESPN, which started bringing in hundreds of staff and crew members eight days earlier; red carpets and VIP’s, a press conference with commissioner Adam Silver, just like he does at the NBA Finals and the All-Star Game, a court lighting arrangement during the game, “championship” caps afterward and the honoring of NBA Legends Dr. J, Gary Payton, LaMarcus Aldridge, Shaquille O’Neal, Robert Horry and Carlos Boozer, who were cheered when they were shown on the videoboard throughout this historic weekend - that make it feel entirely different than any NBA game played in any December in years past. 

This was quite an event put on by Silver, a game that did not count in the standings, but which awarded every player on the winning Los Angeles Lakers team a cool $500,000. (Yes, you are correct if you are thinking to yourself “I was born 20-30 years too soon”).  As many have learned - not everyone leaves Vegas a winner - but the members of the losing team also took home $200,000 apiece, which is not the worst consolation prize in the world.

This is an event no retired NBA player – or anyone else, for that matter – had ever attended.

The stands were full Saturday night as the Lakers defeated the Indiana Pacers 123-109 to win the first In-Season Tournament, which Silver and the NBA pulled off quite nicely to an audience of viewers who knew something new and different was happening over the past couple of weeks but were not quite sure exactly what it was, or what the rules were. LeBron James and Anthony Davis taking it seriously and winning that NBA Cup brought an added level of legitimacy to a brand-new idea that was pulled off with very few hitches and further cemented Las Vegas as a basketball destination.  

A week earlier, the NBRPA held the Legends of Basketball Las Vegas Invitational at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, where Washington faced off against Colorado State and USC battled Gonzaga in the nightcap.  The common threads here - fantastic basketball being played and a formidable showing by NBRPA members.  The LOB Invitational boasted participation from Jay Williams, Detlef Schrempf, Nick Young, Sam Perkins, CJ Watson and Dan Dickau and between the two events – there was no shortage of NBA history out and about in Las Vegas. 

While “Sin City” has been home to the NBA’s Summer League for a while now, our membership’s growing presence here has not gone unnoticed.  Over the past few years, members and the Legends brand have been somewhat of a staple in Las Vegas - having staged the annual Legends Summer Getaway, WNBA All-Star events, and the Legends of Basketball Las Vegas Invitational on the famed strip.  Now, with a yearly event in the IST and the expected addition of an NBA franchise to compliment the WNBA’s back-to-back champion Las Vegas Aces – there is no doubt that the NBRPA’s impact will only increase in Las Vegas. 

What every NBRPA member should realize is that in the years ahead, this is going to be a showcase that gives ex-players a chance to be in the spotlight if they need or want it, because when Silver goes all-in on an event in a gambling town – an event that was a gamble in and of itself – and comes out looking like a winner, his next move will most certainly be a double down.

The thing to remember about Saturday night, December 9, 2023 in Las Vegas was that this event was treated in a grandiose manner by ESPN/ABC and the league office. It is going to be a major NBA event in the years ahead. Whatever tournament tiebreaker rules are changed or tweaked will not matter to retired NBA players, but what should matter is this: The opportunity to shine a spotlight on something will be there, and the only trick to getting into that spotlight will be walking into the T-Mobile Arena using the same entrance, the one with the red carpet, that the WNBA champs and the rapper with the huge watch around his neck used.

Shaq, Horry, Boozer, and the other Legends that attended will all remember being there because the NBA made being in the building feel like it was being at a major event – even though it was a new event.

Whether it’s the second edition of the IST, played next December, or the NBRPA’s events - somebody out there who once played professional basketball may want to bring some attention to something. The best place to do that is now known.

NBRPA’s Acclaimed Health Screening Program Has Also Made Stops in Orlando and Los Angles and is Coming To Atlanta, Detroit, NBA All-Star in Indianapolis, NCAA Women’s Final Four in Cleveland and the NBRPA’s Annual Legends Summer Getaway in Las Vegas

HOUSTON, Texas, (Dec. 4, 2023) - The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) this past weekend brought its acclaimed Health Screening program for former players based in Houston, Texas. NBA/WNBA/ABA and Harlem Globetrotter Legends in the Houston and surrounding area took part in the NBRPA’s Health Screening program at the Houston Rockets’ Toyota Center on Sunday, December 3 and underwent wide-ranging screening procedures that included blood work, electrocardiograms, brain scan, echocardiograms and cardiology consultations.

The critically acclaimed program, under the supervision of the NBRPA's Chief Medical Director Joe Rogowski, focuses on player health, delivers thorough, cost-effective, healthcare to its membership and addresses many of the medical issues experienced by the NBRPA population, while also educating them on proactive measures that promote a healthy lifestyle.

“We are proud to showcase our Health Screening Program for our members living in and around Houston and are extremely thankful for the hospitality offered by the Houston Rockets in providing space at the Toyota Center” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA.  “This robust program – that has also made stops in Orlando and Los Angeles in the past month – presents an incredible occasion for us to bring this impactful program to where our members live and we look forward to continuing to bring this invaluable benefit to other markets across the United States, as well as to Indianapolis for the NBA All-Star weekend in February and to our annual Legends Summer Getaway in Las Vegas later this year.”

Launched in conjunction with the NBPA in 2016 to deliver valuable, preventive long-term healthcare check-ups to former professional players across the U.S., the Health Screening program has impacted hundreds of former players by providing preventative testing, including blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms and cardiology consultations.

The NBRPA announced in 2022 that they would begin overseeing the program and brought along Joe Rogowski to head the operation. Rogowski, who served as the NBPA’s Chief Medical Officer for the past decade, was named the NBRPA’s Chief Medical Director in November 2022.
 
About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Sam Perkins, Secretary Grant Hill, Johnny Davis, Nancy Lieberman, CJ Kupec, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Jerome Williams, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com
 
To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch
 

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Media Contacts:
Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, (516) 749-9894, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com

NBRPA membership is comprised of a diverse group of former professional basketball players of the NBA, ABA, WNBA, and Harlem Globetrotters.

Each month, we'll spotlight one NBRPA member from each league to recognize their career on the court as well as the impact they are now having in their communities.

Rodney Rogers

NBA

Rodney Ray Rogers is an American former professional basketball player who played for several teams in the NBA.

Rogers was the fourth and youngest child born to Willie Wardsworth and Estella Rogers. Rogers attended Hillside High School in Durham. As an athlete, he was known as "the Durham Bull." He was a two-time Greensboro News & Record All-State selection, and was named the 1990 North Carolina state Player of the Year. As a junior, he averaged 22.5 points and 9.7 rebounds, and in his senior year he averaged 28.3 points and 12.3 rebounds on a team that finished 27-2 and advanced to the quarterfinals of the state 4-A playoffs. He was named McDonald's All-American and scored 17 points in the game.

From 1990 until 1993, Rogers played college basketball at Wake Forest University, where he won the 1990–1991 season Rookie of the Year honor and was the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year in 1993, averaging 21.2 points and 7.4 rebounds. His final college statistics were 19.3 points and 7.9 rebounds. Rogers's college jersey #54 was retired in February 1996 by the Demon Deacons.

Rogers was drafted with the 9th pick by the Denver Nuggets in the 1993 NBA draft and spent his rookie year coming off the bench for a team which was the first 8th-seeded team in NBA playoffs history to beat a first-seeded team, the Seattle SuperSonics. Rogers had one significant game in his rookie year, against the Utah Jazz on February 8, 1994. Near the end of the game, Rogers hit three 3-pointers in a span of nine seconds to bring the Nuggets from a 94–86 deficit to a 95–94 lead. However, Jeff Malone hit a jumper with 12 seconds remaining to give the Jazz the 96–95 win.

Right after being drafted by the Denver Nuggets, in the summer of 1993, Rogers married Tisa White. They had three children together, two girls (Roddreka and Rydeiah) and one son (Rodney Rogers II).

After Rogers was traded to the Phoenix Suns in 1999, the family made Paradise Valley, Arizona their home until 2006. Tisa returned to Durham to take over her father's family real estate business, in which Rogers was an investor. He returned to Durham in 2006 and went to work for the City of Durham as a heavy equipment operator. Rogers was promoted to supervisor in the spring of 2008. Most of his Public Works Department co-workers did not know he had been in the NBA until his dirt bike accident later that year.

Rogers is the cousin of former New England Patriots linebacker Tully Banta-Cain.

Rogers was a volunteer girls' basketball coach at Rogers-Herr Middle School, and he co-founded the Durham Eagles youth football team. He enjoyed hunting, riding motorcycles and ATVs, horseback riding and fishing. He is a NASCAR fan and loves big trucks and construction equipment.

On November 28, 2008, Rogers was involved in a dirt bike crash in rural Vance County north of Raleigh. Rogers hit a ditch while riding through a trail and flipped over his vehicle's handlebars. He was first flown to Duke University Medical Center, then on December 3 was moved by air ambulance to the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, which specializes in rehabilitating people with spinal cord and/or brain injuries. Rogers is paralyzed from the shoulders down as a result of the accident, and doctors have given him only a 5% chance of ever walking again.

Arvesta Kelly

ABA

On July 29, the Pittsburgh Pipers of the ABA announced the signing of their 11th player, or more correctly they made their 11th announcement of a player signing. Apparently, Kelly had been signed for several weeks, but legendary Pittsburgh Press sportswriter Roy McHugh let the cat out of the bag in a column the day before. He wrote that the 6-2 guard, a recent graduate of Lincoln University of Missouri, had been in town for weeks, and had already been competing in the Stanton Heights summer basketball league in Pittsburgh. He had been drafted by the St. Louis Hawks in the 8th round, 85th overall, of the NBA Draft, but chose the Pipers because, “he felt his chances were better in a new league.” He found out how rough street ball can be, especially when the opponents find out “you’re college or pro.” Arvesta said he felt like a “clay pigeon,” the standard treatment a target like that would receive in any street ball league in the country. Arvesta is still to this day, one of only two players from Lincoln to play in the NBA or the ABA.

Arvesta Kelly was drafted on May 2nd in the 8th round of the 1967 NBA Draft by the nearby St. Louis Hawks. Arvesta bypassed St. Louis and signed with the Pipers about a month after finishing his college track season which lasted until the end of May.

Arvesta held onto the No. 4 guard slot for the Pipers in 16 regular season games, played 9.1 MPG, and finished 3.9/2.1/0.8 and made three 3-pointers. His season high for points in a regular season game was 15 in a 135-118 win over Anaheim. He played in eight of the 15 playoff games which included two games in the Finals. He played 3.4 MPG and averaged 2.0 PPG. He scored seven points in the final game of the first round series win over the Indiana Pacers. 

Arvesta currently lives in Des Moines, Iowa and is involved in serving at the Community Life Church. He also serves with a local youth organization teaching basketball fundamentals and mentoring youth.

Rushia Brown

WNBA

Rushia Brown was born in the Bronx, NY and raised in South Carolina. As a sophomore, she first picked up a ball and joined the Summerville High School Junior Varsity basketball team. Athletic, yet untrained, Rushia began a journey that would forever change her life. 

Through hard work and dedication, she was one of the top student-athlete recruits in the state of South Carolina as a senior; being courted by esteemed universities such as Harvard, Duke University and her then dream school, the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  However, after the loss of her father, Rushia chose to stay close to home and attend Furman University.  

As a Lady Paladin, Rushia pursued her education and competed on the court, attaining every accolade available including Southern Conference Freshman of the Year, multiple MVPs, Southern Conference Player of the Year, Edna Hartness Athlete of the Year and eventually having her jersey hang from the rafters as #34 was retired, never to be worn again. Rushia’s collegiate years lead to a 10 year professional career overseas, which spanned 5 countries; Spain, France, Italy, Greece and Korea and 7 years in the WNBA; 6 years in Cleveland and 1 year in Charlotte. 

When transitioning from the world of professional sports, Rushia decided that she would only pursue the passions that fed her spirit. She earned her Executive MBA from George Washington University to support her efforts. 

Her entrepreneurial spirit led her to be a part of starting several companies, including the Women’s Professional Basketball Alumnae, the only organization to assist women who have played professionally in the WNBA or Internationally as they transition into mainstream society; ServCom, a nonprofit organization that strives to improve its communities by providing educational and enrichment activities for its citizens; Hearts & Hands Catering, a family business offering health food alternatives; and Young Black Entrepreneur Magazine, a quarterly publication that serves as an educational platform encouraging minorities to start their own businesses.

Brown has made her mark in various sectors of business and continues to travel the world inspiring others to use their gifts and talents to pursue their dreams. Rushia spent 5 years as a WNBA executive. Her 1st experience was working in the NBA/WNBA front office in New York as a member of the Crossover Program. 

In 2018 Brown helped relocate the San Antonio Silver Stars to Las Vegas, where she served  as the Player Programs & Franchise Development Manager for the Las Vegas Aces for 2 years. Brown then served as the Director of Community Relations and Youth Sports for the Los Angeles Sparks for 2 years. She also serves as a catalyst for change for those looking to take their lives and professions to the next level.

Rushia has recently been appointed to position on the advisory board for the WBL, where she's doing groundbreaking work to help revamp the Cleaveland Rockers organization, a team that she played on for 6 WNBA seasons.

Amongst her many accomplishments, what she is currently doing as the latest team member for Edyoucore, may be her most impactful as she travels the country promoting financial literacy amongst high school, college, and professional athletes.

Rushia is the proud mother of one daughter, Morgan MacKenzie Brown, and a proud member of the National Basketball Retired Players Association. 

Respected tremendously amongst her peers within the NBRPA for past contributions to the Association, decades long dedication to women in, during, and after sports; in 2023 Rushia was voted onto the NBRPA's Board of Directors, where she now serves and represents membership with passion, and compassion at heart.

Dave Naves

Harlem Globetrotters

Dave Naves was born and raised on the south side of Chicago. He had always been enthusiastic about basketball, science, and technology. Making a living doing any of these would be a dream come true. That being his vision, he attended Lindblom Technical HS (a STEM school). His parents as well as teachers and coaches at Lindblom Tech were phenomenal and provided him with the guidance that would shape his future education and business endeavors. As a prep, Naves lettered twice on the hardwood for head coach Edward Bjankini at Chicago Lindblom. He led the team in scoring, plus made Chicago Public League All-Central Blue Division and Honorable Mention All-State in 1966-67. Mr. Naves was heavily recruited by some of the top colleges and universities in the country including the University of Iowa (Big 10), Vanderbilt University (SEC) and the University of Kansas (Big 8) and chose to stay close to home and play basketball at Division 1 Northern Illinois University.

A three-year Northern Illinois letter-winner (1967-71) for NIU Hall of Fame coach, Tom Jorgensen, Naves produced 577 points and 324 rebounds in 52 career appearances. Naves went 6-foot-6 and 183 pounds with a deft perimeter shooting touch for a big man. As a sophomore, he averaged 16.3 points per game and 9.7 rebounds.

In 1971, Naves had free agent tryouts with the American Basketball Association Indiana Pacers. The camp included George McGinnis, Darnel Hillman, and Randy Smith. Naves was also invited to try out for the Harlem Globetrotters. Of the 47 hopefuls, Naves was one of five that made the team. During the 1971-72 season Mr. Naves played for both the National and International Units. His National Unit teammates included Harlem Globetrotter legends Meadowlark Lemmon, Curly Neal, Bobby Joe Mason, Pablo Robertson, and Bobby Hunter. The International Unit teammates included Geese Ausby, Mel Davis, and Bobby “Showboat” Hall. The International Unit performed in Canada, Australia/Tasmania, New Zealand, Fiji, Tahiti, Hawaii, and New Caledonia. Following the 1971-1972 tour, Mr. Naves was invited to the Dallas Chaparrals tryouts. After being cut, Mr. Naves opted not to return to Globetrotters and began a 47-year career in engineering.

Throughout his 47-year career, Mr. Naves has held engineering, management, or executive positions with Ford Motor Company/Body Engineering, CSX Rail, Jackson and Tull, Swales Aerospace, and SGT, Inc. Mr. Naves holds 4 patents for railcar designs. He was also the CEO and founder of EG&L Systems, Inc.

 Mr. Naves is currently the Manager-Mission Systems Engineering, for Alutiiq/Alcyon Technical Services (ATS). ATS has a $200M contract to provide systems engineering (mission, spacecraft, science instrument, ground systems, and project management) services to support the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The GSFC focuses on space science that includes heliophysics, planetary science, earth science, and astrophysics programs and projects. In his 37 years providing engineering services at the GSFC, he has supported the Hubble Space Telescope mission; Landsat satellite missions in conjunction with the US Geological Survey; NOAA GOES weather satellite missions to predict changes in the earth’s climate, oceans, and coast as well as the affects of the Sun’s release of charged particles, Space Weather, has on the earth; the GSFC Tracking and Data Relay Satellite constellation’s  spacecraft and ground communication system engineering; and most recently, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/GSFC Mars Sample Return (MSR) Mission-Capture, Containment, and Return System (CCRS) which is a mission to bring soil samples from Mars back to earth.

Mr. Naves has been an active member of the National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) since 2011. He takes very seriously the mission of the NBRPA which is to assist former NBA, ABA, Harlem Globetrotters, and WNBA players in their transition from the playing court into life after the game. Mr. Naves served on the NBRPA Board of Directors for 6 years (2016-2021) representing the Harlem Globetrotters. According to Mr. Naves, “It was an honor and privilege to have served on the Board. I had the opportunity to work with other NBA, ABA, and WNBA Board members to make this organization the best it could be and be responsive to the needs of our members.” During his time on the Board, there was significant membership growth, expansion of programs to help members transition from playing to life after basketball, better transparency between the executive team and the members, increases in revenue, and better coordination with NBRPA Chapter’s. For two straight years, Mr. Naves received an invite from the Harlem Globetrotter Executive Management team to speak to players, during training camp, about planning for life after basketball.

Enthusiastic about giving back to the community, Mr. Naves has coached and given youth basketball clinics and is actively involved with his church. Mr. Naves has a fervent desire to encourage our youth to be the best they can be. He believes that with vision, passion, purpose, guidance, and planning, our youth can be successful in all their endeavors; be it academic, sports, business, or relationships. He really enjoys speaking to young people about careers in science, engineering, and technology. Mr. Naves obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Industry-Technology NIU. Mr. Naves is married and has 3 adult children and 2 grandchildren. He resides in Bowie, Maryland.

NBRPA’s Health Screening Program To Make Stops in Houston, Atlanta, Detroit, NBA All-Star in Indianapolis, NCAA Women’s Final Four in Cleveland and the NBRPA’s Annual Legends Summer Getaway and Golf Experience in Las Vegas

Previous Activations of the Program This Year Were Also Held in Orlando, Florida

LOS ANGELES, California, (Nov. 20, 2023) - The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA), this past weekend brought its acclaimed Health Screening program for former players based in Southern California.  NBA/WNBA/ABA and Harlem Globetrotter Legends in the greater Los Angeles area took part in the NBRPA’s Health Screening program at the LA Clippers’ Training Center on Sunday, November 19 and underwent wide-ranging screening procedures, that included blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms and cardiology consultations.
 
The critically acclaimed program, under the supervision of the NBRPA Chief Medical Director Joe Rogowski, focuses on player health, delivered thorough, cost-effective, healthcare to its membership and address many of the medical issues experienced by the NBRPA population, while also educating them on proactive measures that promote a healthy lifestyle.
 
“We are proud to showcase our Health Screening Program for our members living in and around Los Angeles and are extremely thankful for the hospitality offered by the LA Clippers in providing space at their training facility for this event” said Scott Rochelle, President & CEO, NBRPA.  “This program presents an incredible occasion for us to bring this impactful program to where our members live and we look forward to continuing to bring this invaluable benefit to other markets across the United States, as well as to Indianapolis for the NBA All-Star weekend in February and to our annual Legends Summer Getaway in Las Vegas later this year.”
 
Launched in conjunction with the NBPA in 2016, to deliver valuable, preventive long-term healthcare check-ups to former professional players across the U.S., the Health Screening Program has impacted hundreds of former players by providing preventative testing, including blood work, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms and cardiology consultations.
 
The NBRPA announced in 2022 that they would begin overseeing the program and brought along Joe Rogowski to head the operation. Rogowski, who served as the NBPA’s Chief Medical Officer for the past decade, was named the NBRPA’s Chief Medical Director in November 2022.
 
About the National Basketball Retired Players Association
The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA) is comprised of former professional basketball players from the NBA, ABA, and WNBA. It is a 501(c) 3 organization with a mission to develop, implement and advocate a wide array of programs to benefit its members, supporters and the community. The NBRPA was founded in 1992 by basketball legends Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, Archie Clark, Dave Cowens and Oscar Robertson. The NBRPA works in direct partnerships with the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. Legends Care is the charitable initiative of the NBRPA that positively impacts youth and communities through basketball. Scott Rochelle is President and CEO, and the NBRPA Board of Directors includes Chairman of the Board Charles “Choo” Smith, Vice Chairman Shawn Marion, Treasurer Sam Perkins, Secretary Grant Hill, Johnny Davis, Nancy Lieberman, CJ Kupec, Mike Bantom, Caron Butler, Jerome Williams, Clarence “Chucky” Brown and Dave Bing. Learn more at legendsofbasketball.com
 
To follow along with the NBRPA, find them on social media at @NBAalumni on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch
 

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Media Contacts:
Julio Manteiga, NBRPA, (516) 749-9894, jmanteiga@legendsofbasketball.com